New to Factoring?

For those who aren't familiar with factoring, it is basically a fast way to get cash to run your business.

Factoring is Not a Loan

When you send your customers an invoice, they usually have 30 days to pay you back. Factoring companies will give you the bulk of the cash up front, sometimes within 24 hours, and collect the payments from your customers themselves. Once the invoices are paid in full, you’ll get the balance left over, minus a small fee.


Factoring Doesn't Require Debt

Sounds simple enough – fast cash for your business – no loans, no debt.

So how do you go about choosing the best factoring company?

Not all of them are created equal. Not all of them will give you the same level of service you need to help grow your business.

Everyone claims they have the simplest rate structure in the industry, no long-term contracts, same day funding, no up-front fees, no monthly minimums or maximums, etc., etc., etc.

We also offer these same benefits, but we GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU that other factoring companies don’t.

Here’s Why We Are The Factoring Company You Need For Your Business

No other factoring company matches our level of superior service and offerings.


As you can see, we simply have more to offer you.

Other factoring companies don’t even compare.
Philadelphia

And Not All Factoring Companies Can Say This:

More than half of our new business comes through client referrals.

So, Can Your Company Use Factoring?

Of Course! Companies of all sizes, from small privately-owned companies to large multi-national corporations, use factoring as a way to increase their cash flow. Factoring spans all industries, including trucking, transportation, manufacturing and distribution, textiles, oil and gas, staffing agencies and more.

Companies use the cash generated from factoring to pay for inventory, buy new equipment, add employees, expand operations—basically any expenses related to their business. Factoring allows a company to make quicker decisions and expand at a faster pace.

Unlike a bank loan, factoring has…

  • No principle or interest to pay over time
  • No debt to repay
  • Unlimited funding potential – no caps
  • Fast funding – no waiting months like at a bank
  • Approval is based on the strength of your clients, not your credit
  • Startups are welcome in using funding services

Some of the benefits you receive with factoring are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Information for the city of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, the largest city in Pennsylvania, is located in the southeast part of the state at the junction of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers. It is coextensive with Philadelphia County.Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, was settled in 1681 by Capt. William Markham, who, with a small band of colonists, had been sent out by his cousin, William Penn. Penn arrived the following year with the intention of creating a refuge for the Quakers.In the period before the American Revolution, the city outstripped all others in the colonies in education, arts, science, industry, and commerce.

 

In 1774 1776, the First and Second Continental Congresses met in Philadelphia, and, from 1781 1783, the city was the capital of the United States under the Articles of Confederation. In 1790, it became the nation's capital under the Constitution and remained so until the seat of the federal government moved to Washington in 1800.Within a half century of the founding of the nation at Independence Hall, Philadelphia had emerged as a leader in America's Industrial Revolution. Today the steam locomotives and hat factories of the 19th century have been replaced by diverse manufacturing specialties such as chemicals (including pharmaceuticals), medical devices, transportation equipment, and printing and publishing. In the services sector, Philadelphia leads in subsectors such as health services, insurance carriers, legal services, and architecture and engineering services.

 

Philadelphia is also home to branches of the U.S. Mint, the Federal Reserve System, and the Internal Revenue Service.The city's harbor, one of the largest freshwater ports in the world, is the centerpiece of the AmeriPort facility in south Philadelphia, a major shipping center with rail links to the Midwest and Canada.The city abounds in landmarks of early American history, including Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence was signed, and the Liberty Bell. Other significant tourist attractions are the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Franklin Institute Science Museum, and the Philadelphia Zoological Gardens.

 

 

Information for the state of Pennsylvania

Iron smelting, made possible by abundant supplies of ore and of hardwoods for the furnaces, became important in the 18th cent. In the 19th cent., after the Bessemer process made the use of its great bituminous deposits economical, Pennsylvania quickly emerged as the nation's leading steel producer, but the industry has since declined dramatically. Another Pennsylvania resource, anthracite coal, found in the northeast, long made the state a dominant force in American railroading. In the early 21st cent., shale gas has driven a drilling boom in N and W Pennsylvania.

 

Heavy industry has declined in general, but the state still manufactures metal products, transportation equipment, foodstuffs, machinery, chemicals, and a wide variety of plastic, rubber, stone, clay, and glass products. Agriculture is concentrated in the fertile counties of the southeast, and prized farmlands lie in the Great Appalachian Valley, rich with limestone soils; here the Pennsylvania Dutch farmer built a culture that is identified with the bountiful agrarian life. Principal agricultural products include dairy products, cattle, hay, corn, wheat, oats, mushrooms, poultry, potatoes, and fruit.

 

I do not know how we could be in the position we are today without factoring.  

The idea with factoring is that, as your company grows, the funding of your customer invoices will grow with you. -Pennsylvania Factoring Companies

 

 

NEW FACTORING PROGRAM LEAVES YOUR COMPANY ROLLING IN PROFITS  

Pennsylvania Factoring Companies Articles

The Difference between Accounts Receivable Financing and Factoring

 

Today, it’s not as easy for businesses to access finance as it was in past years, and more companies are being forced to look for alternative, non banking financing options in order to access the capital they require to help their business grow.

 

Two of the more popular tools available to cash strapped business owners are Accounts Receivable Financing (A/R Financing) and factoring. Some business owners believe these two are the same, but there are, in fact, some small yet significant differences.

 

What Is Factoring?

 

Factoring is when a commercial finance company, also known as a factor or factoring company, purchases a business’s outstanding accounts receivable. At that time, the factor will typically advance the business somewhere between 70% and 90% of the invoice’s value. Then, once the invoice is collected from the customer, the remaining balance – minus a factoring fee – is released to the business. The factoring fee could range from between 1.5% and 5.5%. It’s calculated on the total face value of the invoice and depends on how many days the funds are in use and other aspects, like the collection risk.

 

When a business has a factoring contract they can usually choose which invoices they want to sell to the factor: it’s not generally an all or nothing process. Once the factor has purchased an invoice they become responsible for managing the receivable until the account has been paid. Essentially, the factor becomes the business’s accounts receivable department and credit manager, analyzing credit reports, performing credit checks, mailing invoices, and documenting payments.

 

What Is Accounts Receivable Financing?

 

Accounts Receivable Financing is more similar to a traditional bank loan, however there are some key differences. Bank loans are secured with collateral; which might be real estate, the business owner’s personal assets, or plant and equipment; whereas Accounts Receivable Financing is backed by the business’s assets related to the Accounts Receivable. When a business has an Accounts Receivable financing agreement, a borrowing base is established at each draw against which the business is able to borrow money: this would typically be between 70% and 90% of the qualified receivables.

 

Between 1% and 2% is typically charged as a collateral management fee against the outstanding amount, and interest is only calculated as and when the money is advanced. An invoice must be less than 90 days old in order to count towards the borrowing base, and the finance company must deem the business credit worthy. There may also be other conditions to fulfil.

 

So, you can see that there are many similarities between Accounts Receivable financing and factoring; however, one is the sale of an asset (receivables or invoices) to a third party, while the other is actually a loan. In many ways, though, they do act similarly. Below we’ve listed the main features of each so you can determine which would be the best fit for your company.

 

Accounts Receivable Financing

 

• Generally, Accounts Receivable Financing is not as expensive as factoring;
• It can be easier to move from this type of financing to a traditional bank line of credit once a business becomes bankable again;
• Typically, a minimum of $75,000 per month is required in sales to qualify, so this type of financing may not be available to small companies;
• Due to the fact that the business will be required to submit all of its Accounts Receivable to the finance company, this type of financing can be less flexible than factoring.

 

Factoring

 

• It’s quite easy to qualify for factoring, and factoring is the ideal solution for start ups and financially challenged companies;
• Because businesses can decide which invoices they want to sell to the factor, factoring offers more flexibility than Accounts Receivable Financing;
• The company is able to track total costs on an invoice by invoice basis because factoring has a simple and straightforward fee structure.

 

In Conclusion

 

Today we see both Accounts Receivable Financing and factoring as traditional sources of financing; effective when traditional bank financing is not an option. Factoring can carry a business through a period when an immediate cash input is required.

 

Somewhere between 12 and 24 months most companies are generally able to repair their financial situation and once again become bankable. However, some companies in certain industries continue factoring their invoices indefinitely.An example of this is the trucking industry, which relies heavily on factoring for cash flow injections.

 

 

 

I do not know how we could be in the position we are today without factoring.

 

 

Pennsylvania Factoring Companies Articles

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Medical and Healthcare Factoring

 

Receive Payment Today! No Waiting Weeks for Reimbursement!

 

It's certainly no secret that Medicaid, Medicare, HMOs, Workers' Compensation, and other private insurers can take a LONG time to pay your invoices! But now there's good news for healthcare professionals! Now you don't have to wait weeks, sometimes months, to collect on your medical receivables. If you're a healthcare professional and you provide medical or healthcare-related services of any type, we're here to help you!

 

The Difference between Healthcare Factoring and Medical Factoring

 

Healthcare factoring and medical factoring are phrases that are often used interchangeably, probably understandably, but there is a difference between these two. The difference is that healthcare factoring applies when there's no third party payer involved, while a medical factoring company is used when there is a third-party payer involved.

 

Healthcare Factoring and Medical Receivables Factoring are available for the following healthcare providers -

 

- Group and Sole Practitioners
- Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Facilities
- Hospitals
- Chiropractors
- Laboratories
- Durable Medical Equipment
- Medical Coding Services
- Medical Billing Services
- Medical Supply Companies
- Medical Staffing Companies
- Medical Transportation
- Medical Transcription Services
- Ambulance Providers
- Nursing Homes
- Imaging Facilities, such as providers of X-Rays, MRIs, CT Scans, and so on
- Home Healthcare Providers - both Medical and Non-Medical,
- And more!
Healthcare Receivables Factoring

 

Generally, healthcare receivables are associated with customers who are not third-party payers. Some common healthcare sectors include medical staffing companies, medical transcription services, medical billing and coding services, and medical supply companies. When these vendors utilize healthcare factoring they're free to enjoy the benefits of an almost unlimited line of credit - all based on the services they've provided. A simple explanation of factoring healthcare receivables is as follows-

 

- When work has been completed, the healthcare vendor will invoice their customer.
- These customers may include nursing homes, hospitals, medical offices, and so on.
- Next, the vendor will forward a copy of the billing documentation to the healthcare factoring company.
- Within 24 hours, sometimes even less, the factoring company will deposit money into the vendors bank account. The amount deposited will generally be around 85% of the gross value of the invoice.
- The factoring company handles collections on behalf of the vendor, and will retain 15% while awaiting payment.
- Once the invoice has been paid in full, the factor will release the 15% - less their factoring fee - back to the vendor.

 

Medical Receivables Factoring

 

- Regardless of whether you're billing Medicaid, Medicare, HMOs, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, or third-party insurance companies, we have the perfect factoring solution for you. When you start factoring your medical claims you'll achieve instant benefits by receiving upfront capital; while the factor may have to wait months for your customers to settle their accounts. A simple explanation of factoring medical claims is as follows-

 

- The healthcare provider submits claims to the third-party payer, as usual.
- A copy of completed paperwork is then submitted to the factoring company.
- Within 24 hours, sometimes even less, the factoring company will deposit money directly into the medical provider's bank account: the amount deposited will typically be around 85% of the net collectable value.
- Once the claim has been paid in full by the third-party payer, the factoring company will release the remaining 15% - less their factoring fee.

 

"

 

 

Pennsylvania Factoring Companies Articles

Explaining ‘Factoring’

 

A ‘Factor’ is a third party commercial financial company who purchases the Accounts Receivable from businesses: this transaction is known as ‘Factoring’. Factoring exists so that businesses can receive a quick injection of cash, as opposed to waiting the 60 or 90 days for customers to pay their invoices. Factoring is also known as Accounts Receivable Financing, and Invoice Factoring.

 

The majority of factoring companies purchase invoices and advance money to the business within 24 hours; however, the nature and terms of factoring can (and do) differ among financial service providers and industries. Depending on your customers’ credit histories, your industry, and other specific criteria, the advance rate on your invoices can range from 80% to as high as 95%. The factoring company not only collects on your invoices; it also offers back office support to your business.Once the factoring company has collected on your customer’s invoice,you’ll be paid the balance of the invoice – less the factor’s fee for assuming the risk. The primary benefit of factoring is that businesses no longer need to wait anywhere between one and three months for a customer to pay their accounts: they now have access to cash in hand so they can operate and grow their business.The Advantages of Factoring

 

There are a few reasons why factoring has become an invaluable financial tool for many businesses, including start ups. As mentioned above, the main benefit is that businesses can now receive a quick boost to their cash flow because factoring companies, in general, will provide cash on accounts receivable within 24 hours. This resolves the problems businesses experience with short term cash flow, and in many ways this injection of cash can help to grow a business. Besides handling your customer collections, factoring companies can also evaluate your customers’ payment and credit histories.Other benefits of factoring include:

 

• It can be customized to a business’s needs and managed to ensure that capital is available when it’s needed;
• It’s not based on your own business or credit history: it’s based on the quality of your customers’ credit;
• It’s not based on your company’s net worth: it provides a line of credit based on sales;
• There’s no limit to the amount of financing, unlike conventional bank loans;
• This financing will not show up as a debt on your balance sheet, because it’s not a loan.
Who Uses Factoring?

 

Companies of all different sizes, including start ups, use factoring; and today factoring has become common business practice across many industries. Factoring is now widely used in the transportation industry, including manufacturing, textiles, trucking, oilfield services, wholesale and distribution, and staffing agencies. Interestingly, factoring receivables is practiced in many countries around the world and has a long history of success.

 

Can I Factor? My Company’s New, with No Financial History

 

Yes, you can! In fact, factoring has become an excellent tool for start up companies because no company credit history or balance sheet is required. It’s not really your company’s finances that the factoring company is concerned with; they’ll base their financing on your customers’ payment histories and credit scores.

 

What Percentage of My Invoices Should I Factor?

 

The answer to this question really depends on the unique needs of your business. Some companies only factor invoices for customers who typically take a long time to pay, while others factor all their invoices. The receivables that a company can factor range anywhere from a few thousand dollars to millions of dollars each and every month.

 

What’s the Difference between Factoring and a Bank Loan?

 

• The difference between factoring and a bank loan is that you’re not assuming any debt with factoring because it’s not a loan;
• With factoring, there’s no emphasis on your balance sheet – it’s all on your customer’s invoices;
• In addition, a bank loan is typically one lump sum, whereas factoring provides a steady flow of funds;
• Factoring companies can also help improve your company’s balance sheet by assisting with your credit and collection functions;
• A bank loan adds to your debt, whereas factoring converts receivables (an asset) into cash (another asset);
• And of course, bank loans can be very difficult to get because they’re limited by your balance sheet.
How Do You Start the Factoring Process?

 

The factoring process can be very simple to set up. The customer will be asked to complete a short application form, and may be required to follow up with other reports and documents.

 

Recourse and Non Recourse Factoring: What’s the Difference?

 

• With Recourse factoring the client is ultimately responsibility for the payment of the invoice; whereas
• With Non Recourse factoring, the factoring company accepts responsibility for the risk of collecting the invoice.It’s important to note that some factoring companies over offer both types of factoring – recourse and non recourse.

 

What Are the Contract Terms and Fees Applicable with Factoring?

 

There are different fee structures with different factoring companies: some factors charge an overall factoring fee which is determined by the creditworthiness of your customers and the monthly volume of invoices; while others charge additional fees to cover shipping, money transfers, and other costs associated with doing business. Before signing with any factoring company make sure you understand the fees and terms applicable to your contract. Also note that most factoring contacts are renewed annually.

 

Do I Need Credit Insurance on Debtors?

 

Insurance is not typically required, but in specific circumstances it may be.

 

 

 

You Can Find More Information at  http://businessfinancedirectory.org/
and at www.receivablefactoringcompanies.org/

Call Us Today at: 1-866-593-2195

 

Watch our Factoring Company Video below to see how we work for you.

 

 


 

Get CASH NOW for your outstanding receivables.

 

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